David Hallberg to return to the ballet stage in The Australian Ballet’s Coppélia

AFTER a long recuperation after injury, American danseur noble David Hallberg will return to the ballet stage in December – in a place and a part not many would have anticipated. Hallberg will appear with The Australian Ballet during its Sydney Opera House pre-Christmas season, dancing the sunny, wayward Franz in Coppélia. It will be a role debut, for which four performances are scheduled: December 13, 16, 19 and 21.

The AB’s artistic director, David McAllister, confirmed the dates. “We’re very excited to have him do his first shows [on his return from injury] with us,” he said.

David Hallberg photo Wendell Teodoro 4083

David Hallberg at the Sydney Opera House in 2013, when he appeared in Alexei Ratmansky’s Cinderella. Photo: Wendell Teodoro

Hallberg’s choice of the AB for his return performances makes sense, in that AB staff have been involved in his rehabilitation over the past year or so. As for Coppélia, that’s just what the AB had on its schedule at the moment, but its cheerful, uncomplicated nature is perhaps a bonus. Hallberg will be able to have fun after an extended period of recovery.

Hallberg, 34, had surgery on his left ankle in August 2014, which led him to cancel engagements for that year. Withdrawals from performances in 2015 were later announced. He is a principal artist with both American Ballet Theatre and the Bolshoi Ballet, joining the latter in 2011. He is the only American to be invited into the Bolshoi’s highest rank.

Hallberg is also a sought-after guest artist and has formed a close connection with the AB. He first danced with the company in the Peter Wright Nutcracker in 2010 and was to have starred in the AB’s 50th anniversary gala in 2012, although injury prevented that engagement. He danced the role of the Prince in the new version of Cinderella created for the company by Alexei Ratmansky in 2013. Last year Hallberg devised a program called David Hallberg Presents: Legacy, which was presented during the 2015 Youth America Grand Prix. The AB was one of a handful of companies he selected to take part to illuminate their individual “texture, vocabulary and singular place in dance history”.

He wasn’t entirely missing in action as a performer last year. With artist Francesco Vezzoli he created a piece called Fortunata Desperata for New York’s Performa festival, a biennial visual arts performance event that embraces cross-disciplinary work. As Gia Kourlas described it in a review for The New York Times, Fortuna Desperata explored “15th century Italian court dance, which put down the roots for classical ballet. In other words, no leaps required: at the most, lilting, gentle hops.”

While he has an extensive and varied repertoire, Hallberg has been particularly admired in ballet’s core princely roles. The chief dance critic of The New York Times, Alastair Macaulay, wrote in 2014, just before Hallberg was forced to step out of the limelight: “By the time he joined the Bolshoi in 2011, Mr. Hallberg was already the world’s foremost paragon of classical style … His virtues grow when he dances, thanks to the purity and singing lyricism of his line and the dazzling clarity of his execution.”

These qualities will certainly be of use in Coppélia, but in a rather more light-hearted context than ballets already in Hallberg’s repertoire. Franz is a lively young man whose larrikin charm exceeds his mental acuity. Franz’s attention drifts from his fiancée Swanilda when he spots the apparently aloof Coppélia. Her lack of interest in him – chiefly because she is a life-size doll made by the mysterious Dr Coppelius – leads Franz into trouble from which the resourceful Swanilda must rescue him. They can then proceed with their wedding.

At the AB the ballet is performed in a 1979 version based on the original choreography by Arthur Saint-Leon, as revised by Petipa and Cecchetti with additional choreography by Peggy van Praagh, the AB’s founding artistic director. Theatre director George Ogilvie “devised and directed” the production and has been involved in its restaging this year. Designs are by Kristian Fredrikson.

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